Tour India


TOUR INDIA WORK IN PROGRESS Many years ago I attended an auction at which I bought a slide projector. This is an item that if you are under 40 you will have no idea what one is or what it was used for. Anyway, in the box was another box that contained a nicely labelled collection of 35mm black and white negatives. When I looked at these it contained a real treasure trove of images. Firstly, being 35mm film suggests a very early use of this format. Secondly, the images showed a tour of India of the newly married couple from the Throgmorton family. These negatives showed the couple flying to India in a Imperial Airways Sutherland flying boat. They were in a very priveleged position in that they were guests of the Marahaja of Jaipor. The visit is often mentioned in the Marajaha biography. The images speak for themselves in that they show an way of life long, long forgotten, not just the upper class in India but the way the Marahjas treated their subjects.

The Short Empire was a medium-range four-engined monoplane flying boat, designed and developed by Short Brothers during the 1930s to meet the requirements of the growing commercial airline sector, with a particular emphasis upon its usefulness upon the then-core routes that served the United Kingdom. It was developed and manufactured in parallel with the Short Sunderland maritime patrol bomber, which went on to serve in the Second World War; a further derivative that was later developed was the piggy-back Short Mayo Composite. The development of the Short Empire had been heavily influenced by its primary customer, Imperial Airways, who had originally developed the requirements to which it was initially ordered and designed from. Imperial Airways, and its successor, the British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC), along with Qantas and TEAL, operated the type in commercial service. Upon entering service, the Empire routinely flew between the British mainland and Australia and the various British colonies in Africa and Asia, typically carrying a combination of passenger and mail cargoes; the Empires were also used on various other routes, such as on the service between Bermuda and New York City.

    

 

I always give my dead batteries away. Free of charge.